Contact Us  |  Site Map  |  Log In
Home FAQ Products Order About Blog Allergies Contact Non-Retail Buyers My Account
Butter Oil 17
By-Products 4
Cod Liver Oil 102
Dave's Rants 45
General Health Topics 85
Office and service updates 14
promotions 13
Skate Liver Oil 10
Skin Care 6
Vitamin A 19
Vitamin D 36
Recent Posts
Cure Gum Disease Naturally Book Giveaway...
Scientific Analysis of Oxidation Test Reports by Dr. Subramaniam Sathivel...
Scientific Analysis of Oxidation Test Reports by Dr. Vicki Schlegel...
Fermented Cod Liver Oil Label Clarification...
Opinions of Craig Elding/ The Health Cloud. Report Analysis...
about our products agriculture Book Giveaway coconut oil dental discussion detoxification economics economy environmental toxins farming fatty acids FDA feed grade products fermentation Fermented Cod Liver Oil Label fish fertilizer Freedom From Fibromyalgia General Health Discussion Glyphosate GMO foods health freedom history of CLO how to take humor Leah E. McCllough new product office ordering information other products production methods promotions Recipes sacred food Sale/Promotion scientific analysis service updates skin products storage testimonial testing vitamin D what are we doing whole foods
By Author
Green Pasture Products
David Wetzel of Green Pasture Products
Dr. Donal Weber - Posted Green Pasture Products
Green Pasture Products - Wikipedia Source
Natural News - Mike Adams, the Health Ranger
David Noakes
Minute Earth
Maria Atwood, CNHP
Dr. Danenberg
Metro Manila, Philippines
Article #1 Tom Boggioni and Article #2 Mark Hefflinger
Norfolk Daily News/DARIN EPPERLY
Dr. Jerome J. King, Dr. Randolph M. Howes, and Dr. Jie Zhang
Well Being Journal Vol. 24, No, 2- Alvin Danenberg, D.D.S
Green Pasture
Alvin H. Danenberg, DDS
Historic Trivia
VI Perez
Ethan J. Anderson and David A. Taylor
Green Pasture - Jie
Bruce Fife N.D.
Sandrine Love and Mohmmad Naser
Dr. David Levi, ND
Chris Kresser
Michael F Holick
Foster Clug
Yahoo News - Foster Klug
Michelle - Spirit State Chief Blogger and Editor
Conan Milner, Epoch Times | December 20, 2013
David Wetzel
Sir Albert Howard, CLE
Alison Birks, MS AHG, CNS
Edurne Ubani
L.J. DE Jongh MD
Dr Wendy Meyer
Louis Williams
Adam Cloe
Dr. Don Huber
Dave Wetzel
Raine Saunders
Dr. Donald Weber
fish scam
Waleed M. Abuzeid; Nadeem A. Akbar; Mark A. Zacharek Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Andre Evans
Dr Eva Sirinathsinghji
Gary North
The Economic Collapse Blog
Hank Mills
Martin A. Armstrong
aajonus vonderplanitz, phd, scientific nutritionist
Dr. Orly Taitz. Esq.
David Wetzel
Mark Crislip under General,Herbs and Supplements
Dr. David G. Williams
Catherine O'Driscoll on April 26, 2011
Eric Odom ~ Planes, Trains, and Politics
Dr. Rosann Volmert DO
Gary Friedman
Quoting from SafeLawns.Blog posted Wednesday, February 16, 2011 Paul Tukey
Dr.Huber's Letter To the USDA
Written Heda Belle Decrito, R.N

Fewer bees in US a threat to world's almond supply

February 17, 2013


The bee problem has been identified by some as a result of a certain class of insecticides.... ones that coat seeds and used in other ways...If i recall ponch, goucho are a couple names given to some within this class.  I think i read that the issue as been resolved in the EU by banning this class of insecticides...  Anyone what to share more on this topic.  Has there been new insecticides that skirt the EU ban?  Good book on the topic.  "A spring without bees."


TURLOCK, Calif. (AP) — In an almond orchard in California's Central Valley, bee inspector Neil Trent pried open a buzzing hive and pulled out a frame to see if it was at least two-thirds covered with bees.

Trent has hopped from orchard to orchard this month, making sure enough bees were in each hive provided by beekeepers. Not enough bees covering a frame indicates an unhealthy hive — and fewer working bees to pollinate the almond bloom, which starts next week across hundreds of thousands of acres stretching from Red Bluff to Bakersfield.

"The bloom will come and go quickly," said Trent, who works for the Bakersfield-based bee broker Scientific Ag Co. "The question is: Will the almond seeds get set? It depends if you have enough of a workforce of bees."

That has growers concerned as nomadic beekeepers from across the country converge on the state with their semi-trucks, delivering billions of bees to the orchards for the annual pollination. Most almond trees depend on bees to transfer pollen from the flower of one tree variety to the flower of another variety before fertilization, which leads to the development of seeds.

It's a daunting task: California's orchards provide about 80 percent of the global almond supply. And with almond acreage increasing steadily in recent years, the bees must now pollinate 760,000 acres of trees. The number of bees needed is expected to increase as almond demand grows and orchards continue to expand.

Already, more than half of the country's honeybees are brought to California at the end of February for almond pollination, which requires about 1.5 million hives from out of state, and another 500,000 from elsewhere in the state. Honeybees are preferred for commercial-scale pollination, because they are social, build larger colonies than other bees, and their hives can easily be moved.

Bee brokers, beekeepers and almond growers around the state say there's a shortage of healthy honeybees for this year's pollination, especially after colony collapse disorder took a higher toll this winter. The disorder, in which honey bees suddenly disappear or die, wipes out thousands of colonies each year.

The shortage has some growers scrambling for bees — even sub-performers — as trees are about to bloom, driving up bee prices again this year, to an all-time high of more than $200 per colony.

"There's definitely a shortage of strong bee colonies," said Joe Traynor, owner of Scientific Ag, which connects growers with beekeepers. "There is a problem covering all the acres of almonds in the state."

Since it was recognized in 2006, colony collapse disorder has destroyed colonies at a rate of about 30 percent a year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Before that, losses were about 15 percent a year from pests and diseases. No one has determined its cause, but most researchers point to a combination of factors, including pesticide contamination, poor nutrition and bee diseases.

This year, experts say, the die-off has been as high as 40 to 50 percent for some beekeepers.

"We have smaller populations in the hives and higher winter losses," said Eric Mussen, a bee specialist at the entomology department of University of California, Davis. "Bees across the country are not in as good a shape as last year. When you stress them far enough, the bees just give in."

This year, Mussen said, many bees did not get enough nutrition because a Midwest drought reduced forage. Conversion of pasture land to corn production for ethanol also reduced the number of flowers producing nectar.

To compensate for forage loss, beekeepers fed bees more high-fructose corn syrup and other supplements. But such substitutes don't provide all the nutrients pollen does, Mussen said. Malnourished bees are more susceptible to diseases.

Lance Sundberg, a beekeeper who hauled his hives for almond pollination from Columbus, Mont., lost 40 percent of his bees this winter due to the drought and mite problems.

"You have to buy bees elsewhere to pick up your losses, and not everything we have remaining after the loss is very strong," said Sundberg. "I had a tough time fulfilling my obligations to all the growers."

But at least he still has bees, Sundberg said. Some colleagues were not as lucky: they lost 75 percent or even 99 percent.

Traynor, the bee broker, said he's been fielding phone calls from desperate beekeepers and growers who are short several thousand colonies — but he has no more good bees to offer them. The shortage will only get worse in the future, he said, as almond acreage grows.

Having strong hives is critical, Traynor said, especially during rainy seasons, because bees have a short period of flight time when it's dry enough to pollinate. Fewer bees may not be able to reach all the blooms in time.

In recent years, the Almond Board of California, which represents more than 6,000 growers, has poured $1.4 million into bee health research. The group also worked on alternatives to reduce growers' reliance on honeybees, said Bob Curtis, associate director of agricultural affairs.

One is the so-called "self-compatible" almond tree, which can set nuts using pollen transferred among its own flowers, thereby needing fewer bees.

The group also is urging growers to plant forage to help sustain bees before and after almond pollination. And it's exploring using blue orchard bees, which are solitary bees that do not live in hives but nest in small cavities, to augment the honeybee workforce. But building up those alternatives will take time.

"It's tenuous right now," Curtis said. "We've got fewer bees. And if something goes wrong with the weather, some growers could be in trouble."

Categories: Dave's Rants
Tags: agriculture


Add your comment...

Your Name (required)
eMail Address (required - never shown publicly)
Location City & State or Province & Country
Optional Image Allowable file extensions are jpg,jpeg,gif,png and maximum size is 500 KB
Gavin Bondy, Portland, Oregon , March 6, 2013 at 10:47 PM | Reply
Bravo, Poland! If you want to learn more in dramatic fashion, see "Queen of the Sun: What Are the Bees Telling Us?" Great 2011 movie. (Netflix has it on streaming.) Stunning.
PJ Alvanos, Venice, FL , February 21, 2013 at 2:27 PM | Reply
I read recently that Poland has banned Monsanto GMO corn because it kills bees.

Comments Bookmark and Share Share Print Permalink

Home | FAQ | Products | Order | About | Blog | Allergies | Contact | Non-Retail Buyers | My Account

Copyright © 2002-2015, Green Pasture Products, Inc. All rights reserved.  |  Product Photographs courtesy of Sandrine Hahn 
X-Factor Gold, Blue Ice, and Blue Breeze are trademarks of Green Pasture Products, Inc.
Terms of UseReturns/Changes & Cancellations Privacy Policy 

Powered by FullPartner